America’s Not Ready for Today’s Gray Wars

Discussion in 'U.S. Strategic Affairs' started by Falcon, Dec 13, 2015.

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  1. Falcon

    Falcon Major Staff Member Social Media Team

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    By: Eric Olson

    As Washington struggles to respond to brutal acts of violence from Syria to San Bernardino, much of the conversation is about the size and scope of our response to defeat our enemies.

    Although Americans by now understand that we are not in a traditional war against an armed state, we still fail to comprehend the true complexities and profound challenges of conducting a broad range of military and law enforcement actions in smaller, less straightforward operations against terrorists and their organizations.

    More here:
    http://www.defenseone.com/ideas/2015/12/americas-not-ready-todays-gray-wars/124381/?oref=d-mostread
     
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  2. Technofox

    Technofox That Norwegian girl Staff Member Ret. Military Developer

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    The US, for all its dealings in the international arena, is still concerned first and foremost with its own lands, so I'll focus on this, rather than a grey conflict taking place outside of the US border.

    *From a terrorism perspective:

    I don't know if I completely agree. Acts that occur get the headlines, but how many have been stopped by US law enforcement prior to their occurrence. Somethings will slip through the dragnet, it happens, it's not preventable even with the most draconian of measures. We know about the terrorist incidents that do happen, and they cause terror and all sorts of irrational politics, and inevitable increased gun sales. But US law enforcement and international agencies like INTERPOL have been doing this for a long time, and they're quite good at it. Remember, terrorism and stopping it is an international game. The acts we hear about and those that occur are the failures of our collective intelligence, but for every one that happens hundreds are stopped before they can do any damage.

    *From a military, irregular force perspective:

    Russia's annexation of Crimea is always used as an example in this discussion, but the operation wasn't successful because it was secretive, we all knew about it happening - the Russian's just gambled that no one would stop them, and they won that debate. But try this in the US with Chinese or Russian special forces... will it work this time? I have a hard time believing no one would notice a bunch of armed foreigners, or their entry craft. Neither is walking their way into the US, they'll be detected way before they get here. These types of actions, with irregulars, wont work in the US... but then again, elsewhere could sucker the US into the conflict. It hasn't worked that way in Ukraine, but who says it wont in Poland?

    Rather than a mass infiltration by an armed adversary, hell knows Russia isn't landing or dropping troops into the US, they aren't crossing the Mexican or Canadian borders either, I feel the biggest irregular military threat is still a 1996 Gangneung submarine infiltration incident type of event. Small teams of special forces, just as the US does in Somalia, Libya and Syria, infiltrate and cause havoc.

    [​IMG]

    You'll notice 100, but not 10. A Crimea is just too conspicuous to work in the US.

    ...

    While terrorism remains a concern, US law enforcement in conjunction with their international partners are doing a good job, a great job considering all the negative attention the US garners around the world. An incident will occur, it happens, you can't stop them all, but their gravity and frequency are declining.

    As for an infiltration by irregulars, well the US isn't ignorant to that either. It puts these same scenarios to use in its special forces activities in Africa and the Middle East, perhaps South America and Asia too. The US knows the tools, the tricks and their tell-tail signs. And while their efforts are spent more on using these same skills overseas, they are training for a Crimea happening in the US too.

    I don't think the US is unprepared at all. Their counter-terrorism forces are the world's best and their slew of international partners only serves to bolster this already impressive capability. The US knows all about irregular forces, it has and uses them too. They are taking steps, in and out of public view, but they are hardly unprepared.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2015
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  3. Falcon

    Falcon Major Staff Member Social Media Team

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    I agree. I think there is a lot of hype often times on what are presumed to be weaknesses we have. Sometimes people throw in sources saying that Russia took over Crimea, they are better than us in cyber or EW without talking about how we are very advanced in those fields and are probably much better than them.

    We also have many freedoms in the U.S that other countries like Russia or China don't have so of course we will have less security but the benefits of those freedoms are seen when looking at our economy, culture, and media influence. Another important fact is that we can actually deploy troops all around the world and sustain long term military operations on a large scale. Our adversaries can not do this.
     
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