Budget Cuts damage Army's Competitive Edge

Discussion in 'U.S. Army' started by Pathfinder, Apr 6, 2016.

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  1. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

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    Budget cuts are forcing the Army to lose its competitive edge

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    Our competitive advantage we’ve continually banked on is decreasing, [and] the Army risks losing its qualitative overmatch in future conflicts,” said Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center. “With the 74 percent decrease in Army modernization total obligation authority since 2008, the risk to mission and soldiers is increasing.”

    This risk is compounded by the growing demand for land forces around the world, McMaster told the Senate Armed Services Committee’s Airland subcommittee.

    “We’re having a harder and harder time for the small force to keep pace with the demand,” he said.

    He added that the Army is “behind in modernization against current and future threats,” and “we have no current major ground combat vehicle in development,” which is why the Army’s Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles likely will remain in the Army’s inventory for the next 50 to 70 years, even after they’re obsolete.

    Another critical area where the Army is lagging is cyber and electronic warfare, McMaster said, citing the ongoing conflict in Ukraine as a “real wake up call.”

    http://www.defensenews.com/story/mi...cing-army-lose-its-competitive-edge/82672258/

    How is this evening happening? We spend so much damn money and will lose our competitive advantage? Sometimes I don't even believe these kinds of things especially when people praise the Russian and Chinese militaries. Those guys have hordes of T-72 based vehicles and older Modenrized Soviet Vehicles but journalists still give them praise, why don't they apply the same logic to our military? Maybe they like controversial click bait articles? Its always fun to be scared isn't? We have played this game in every phase of our history with every adversary but somehow we always came out on top.
     
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  2. Technofox

    Technofox That Norwegian girl Staff Member Ret. Military Developer

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    This does seem rather hyperbolic doesn't it? Within the US Army there is a lot going on. The JLTV, Stryker's being armed with turrets, the Abrams is being upgraded again, electronic warfare programs are progressing, 3D printing is gaining traction and acceptance, the M109 is being upgraded to the A7, the Army's TACMS missiles are reentering production... oh, and these are things that can be found on our forum!!! It's not as if it's hidden from public eyes.

    There are some issues too, electronic warfare being at the top of that list, but the US Army is losing its competitive advantage? With laser weapons, a replacement for the UH-60 and a whole host of things other nations haven't even started on coming in the near future I don't think the US Army is losing anything.
     
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  3. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

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    The state of the Army is pretty good imo, you pretty much listed everything out. I think with EW we could be behind (in land forces terms) but that isn't very difficult to resolve and I don't think EW is an expensive capability to have especially for land forces
     
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  4. AMDR

    AMDR Captain Staff Member Administrator

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    I can see how the Army is behind in Electronic Warfare, but in cyber warfare they are making great progress and are making the Chinese and Russians react to the US cyber buildup

    Army making 'tremendous' progress in cyber
    • BY MARK POMERLEAU
    • APR 06, 2016
    The Army is making progress toward filling out its cyber force, which will contribute to the Defense Department-wide joint force of 133 cyber teams totaling roughly 6,200 personnel.

    “The Army is on track to meet its goal to 41 [cyber mission force] teams by this October,” Andrew “A.J.” Forysiak, director of the Capabilities, Implementation, and Modernization Directorate for Army Cyber Command, told an audience at an AFCEA-hosted panel March 31. Forysiak added that 36 teams are at initial operating capability and 10 are at full operational capability, with all expected to reach FOC by October 2016.

    The idea is that “by the end of 2016, all the teams will be in place and at initial operating capability. And by the end of 2018, we expect all those teams to be at full operational capability,” Air Force Lt. Gen. James McLaughlin, deputy commander of the U.S. Cyber Command, told an audience at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in October.

    From: https://defensesystems.com/articles/2016/04/06/army-cyber-mission-force-grows.aspx
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    From: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news...-china-plans-cyberwarfare-force-to-/?page=all

    A Chinese military official revealed last month that Beijing plans to rapidly build a new People’s Liberation Army cyberwarfare force in response to U.S. military cyberforces.

    Col. Li Minghai of the PLA’s National Defense University wrote in the Communist Party-affiliated Global Times newspaper that a new cyberwarfare force is needed to counter the United States as the Pentagon is building up its cyberattack capabilities.

    “We should apply the brand-new development model in the information age to remold our cyberwarfare preparedness against the threat of the United States’ new cyberstrategy and guarantee our nation’s cybersecurity,” he said.
     
  5. F-22

    F-22 2nd Lieutenant

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    The US has a long history of hyping up threats. Remember the "bomber and missile gap" vs the Soviets in the Cold War? It turns out that "gap" never existed. Of course we never want to underestimate our opponents, so we're constantly seeking ideas and ways to improve the force. I think this mindset has helped us maintain our innovative edge and not become complacent.

    There are definitely areas where our Army needs to improve, but the state of the force is not as bad as they make it seem.
     
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  6. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

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    Operators shift to cyber electromagnetic activities


    ARLINGTON, Va. (Army News Service, April 5, 2016) -- A seismic shift has occurred recently in cyber for Soldiers and operators at the corps level and below, said Brig. Gen. Patricia A. Frost. It's known as cyber electromagnetic activities, or CEMA.

    Frost, deputy commanding general (Operations), U.S. Army Cyber Command, spoke March 31 at a Hot Topics forum on Army Installation Management.

    She emphasized that CEMA capabilities are both for protection of the homeland as well as assets to be used by combatant commanders, so this capability must be expeditionary.

    CEMA DESCRIBED

    Field Manual 3-38 Cyber Electromagnetic Activities (Feb. 12, 2014), describes CEMA in a nutshell:

    CEMA aims to exploit an advantage over enemies in both cyberspace and the electromagnetic spectrum, while simultaneously "denying them use of the same and protecting the mission command system."

    Broken into its elements, CEMA consists of the synchronization of cyberspace operations, electronic warfare, spectrum management operations, per FM 3-38. The FM notes in the introduction that this "is the first doctrinal manual of its kind."

    CEMA is a tool that's critical to operations, and as such, the commander is the central figure in the conduct of CEMA, she said.

    "We're congressionally mandated to build [this capability]," Frost added.

    CEMA IMPERATIVE

    The shift to the integration of capabilities within CEMA occurred, Frost said, because in just the last five years, "the information environment has changed drastically [and], the threat has changed how we have to look at how we train our forces."

    That threat, she explained, has to do with CEMA-like capabilities being built by peer or near-peer adversaries that threaten troops, should they deploy in harm's way.

    WHAT'S BEING DONE

    To "scope the problem," meaning getting one's hands around the extent of the threat, "we've created an expeditionary cyber pilot," Frost said, that involves a partnership with U.S. Training and Doctrine Command, U.S. Army Forces Command, and the combat training centers.

    Elements of the cyber mission force were involved in a National Training Center rotation at Fort Irwin, California, recently, she said. Also, about 18 months ago, another CEMA-type pilot was done at the Joint Readiness Training Center, Fort Polk, Louisiana.

    This July, there will be yet another exercise where "we'll actually bring in electronic warfare so we will scope what that means in terms of capabilities and requirements for corps and below," she said.

    Besides scoping the problem, these exercises will also inform requirements for software and hardware needed, she said, adding it's an exciting time to be an operator.

    ON PATROL

    Frost then offered an example of a squad of Soldiers on patrol.

    A patrol leaves its forward operating base with incredible intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. They can literally "see themselves and the environment they're operating in," she said.

    "But then, there's also a logical environment operating alongside that patrol that is feeding the enemy, position, navigation, timing, targeting information that fits in the cyberspace domain that I believe -- and this is my personal opinion -- that a brigade commander needs to be able to [better] see that battlespace," she said.

    Cyber mission force capability hasn't yet been built down to that level yet, but that's where she said she thinks it needs to be because it's that important.

    "The information environment is exploding every day," Frost concluded. "Soldiers need to know how to navigate through that environment."

    http://www.army.mil/article/165494/Operators_shift_to_cyber_electromagnetic_activities/
     
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