Despite 419 Deficiencies the F-35 Moves Forward

Discussion in 'F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Program' started by Pathfinder, Feb 11, 2016.

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  1. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

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    F-35 Program Moving Forward, Addressing Challenges, Official Says

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    WASHINGTON, February 10, 2016 — The F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter program is moving forward while addressing various challenges, the program's executive officer said today.

    "In the big picture, I would tell you that the program right now is accelerating, growing and changing," Air Force Lt. Gen. Christopher C. Bogdan said at a media roundtable in Arlington, Virginia.

    He detailed a number of challenges in the program, including incorporating fixes to address the current flight restrictions on lightweight pilots.

    "The mark of a good program is you find the problems, you solve the problems and you keep the program moving forward without derailing it," he said.

    The development program, he said, is scheduled to be completed in the fall of 2017.

    "What we're trying to do right now is work toward that very large $50-plus-billion contract and turn that into a modernization program," he said, adding that the program will have to be more efficient than has been the case in the last 15 or more years.

    Addressing Issues, Moving Forward

    The program currently has 419 deficiencies to be corrected, Bogdan said, explaining that the figure is "not that many." Despite the challenges, he added, the program is advancing.

    "We are making progress,” the general said. “Sometimes it's not as fast as we want. Sometimes it's messy. Sometimes we have setbacks.”

    The problems include issues with software, hardware, and the Autonomic Logistics Information System, or ALIS. He noted that 700 to 800 deficiencies already have been addressed.

    Possible Dangers for Lightweight Pilots

    Due to a possible risk of neck injury should ejection be necessary, lightweight pilots are restricted from flying the F-35s. For a pilot weighing between 103 and 136 pounds, Bogdan said, the odds of that person having to eject and then being injured in the ejection are one in 50,000.

    The changes being implemented include a "heavy/light" weight switch, the general said. When in the "light" position, the seat would delay the parachute's extraction by milliseconds if the pilot had to eject, so the shock and stress on the neck would be reduced, he explained.

    A restraining device also was sewn into the risers behind the parachute so that if a lightweight pilot were to eject at a "weird angle" it would stop the pilot's head from going backward, he added.

    The head restraint and the seat switch have been tested, and they work, he said, adding that those fixes are ready to go into the field and in production by the end of the year.

    Meanwhile, Bogdan said, the helmet's weight has to be reduced from 5.1 pounds to between 4.6 and 4.8 pounds. That change is lagging behind the other fixes by at least eight or nine months.

    "I don't like that," he added, noting that all three solutions must be in place before the restriction on lightweight pilots can be lifted.

    Air Force Deferring Orders

    Bogdan said the Air Force's announcement yesterday that it intends to buy 43, rather than 48, F-35s in fiscal year 2017 is "almost a non-news event." The Air Force is deferring purchases, not cutting airplanes, he explained.

    The Navy kept its fiscal 2017 “C” models of the jet at four, and the Marine Corps went from 14 to 16 airplanes for the “B” model, he said, noting that amounts to a net loss of three airplanes for the U.S. services.

    The program plans to deliver more than 870 airplanes over the next six years, Bogdan said, adding that one can "barely measure" the reduction from the Air Force in that timeframe, he said.

    The general said he is looking at the program "holistically," taking into account international partners as well as possible future customers.

    http://www.defense.gov/News-Article...g-forward-addressing-challenges-official-says
     
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  2. Falcon

    Falcon Lieutenant Colonel Staff Member Social Media Team

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    Like Lt. Gen Bodgin said some of the problems are simple and others take more time to solve. This air plane has so many bells and whistles that 419 problems are not a big deal. The F-35 crossed the Atlantic, it is dropping munitions, it is working with other 4 gen aircraft, many countries are lining up to buy it and can't wait to get their hands on it so obviously the F-35 critics are wrong about the whole thing. They try to pick at little things here and there. We are moving forward in aerospace engineering and in warfare in general. People who don't like the F-35 will go nuts when more details on our 6th generation fighter gets more media coverage.
     
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  3. Technofox

    Technofox That Norwegian girl Staff Member Ret. Military Developer

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    Problems happen, name me a military program that doesn't or didn't have them... I'll wait. The M-16, F-22, M1 Abrams... and on and on. The F-35 is a new system with a lot of parts, especially software, it's going to take time to get them right. It happens.

    But the problems are always solved.

    In the mean time:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Seems happy doesn't he? We're happy, we're confident the problems will be solved. If we weren't, SAAB would be getting a few phone calls on their Gripen NG from Norway
     
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  4. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

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    If there were serious issues with this bird countries facing economic issues and countries that face capable adversaries like Russia and Iran would not be wasting their money on it our bank on it for their security. Countries plan to fly fighter jets for decades and they take years to decide which plane they will select as their primary fighter. There are many fighter jets on the market ranging from older American Jets, to the Euro fighter, to the Rafael and in the Future Korean and Turkish Fighter jets if the F-35 was that bad they would go for one of those without even wasting any energy talking about the F-35.


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  5. T-123456

    T-123456 Captain Staff Member International Mod

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    Turkiye will get the first two in 2017,the block 3F configuration.
     
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