Huntington Ingalls to Design LX(R) Class of Amphibious Ships

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  1. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

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    Huntington Ingalls Industries Awarded Design Work For New LX(R) Class of Amphibious Ships

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    PASCAGOULA, Miss., Aug. 29, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has been awarded a $13.7 million contract (with incremental funding) to perform contract design effort for the U.S. Navy’s amphibious warfare ship replacement, known as LX(R).

    LX(R) will replace the Navy’s Harpers Ferry- and Whidbey Island-class dock landing ships and will use the same hull as the San Antonio (LPD 17) class. Ingalls has delivered 10 of the LPD 17 ships to the Navy, is currently building the 11th, Portland(LPD 27), and has received more than $258 million in advance procurement funding for the 12th, Fort Lauderdale (LPD 28).

    More here:
    http://newsroom.huntingtoningalls.c...s?hootPostID=d43c62ec930909f318cd97fe434ea287
     
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  2. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

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    The LX(R) program is a program to build a new class of 11 amphibious ships for the Navy. The Navy wants to procure the first LX(R) in FY2020. LX(R)s are to replace 12 aging Whidbey Island/Harpers Ferry (LSD-41/49) class amphibious ships, the first of which will reach age 40 in 2025. The design of the LX(R) is to be derived from the design of the Navy’s San Antonio (LPD- 17) class amphibious ships, the 12th of which was procured in FY2016.

    Amphibious Lift Goal

    The Navy’s 308-ship force structure goal calls for achieving and maintaining a 34-ship amphibious force that includes 11 LHA/LHA-type amphibious assault ships, 12 San Antonio (LPD-17) class amphibious ships, and 11 LSD/LX(R)-type amphibious ships (11+12+11).5 Navy and Marine Corps officials had previously agreed that a 33-ship (11+11+11) force would minimally meet the Marine Corps’ goal of having an amphibious ship force with enough combined capacity to lift the assault echelons (AEs) of 2.0 Marine Expeditionary Brigades (MEBs). A 33-ship force would include 15 amphibious ships for each MEB, plus 3 additional ships to account for roughly 10% of the amphibious ship force being in overhaul at any given time. In February and March 2015 testimony, the Navy has explained that the 33-ship (11+11+11) requirement had been revised to a 34-ship (11+12+11) requirement to reflect the procurement in FY2016 of a 12th LPD-17 class ship.

    Marine Corps and Navy officials also agree that a 38-ship amphibious force would more fully meet the Marine Corps’ 2.0 MEB AE amphibious lift requirement. Such a force would include 17 amphibious ships for each MEB, plus 4 additional ships to account for ships in overhaul. Although a 38-ship force would more fully meet the Marine Corps’ lift requirement, the Navy and Marine Corps agreed to accept the operational risks associated with having a 33-ship (now 34- ship) force rather than a 38-ship force as a means of living within fiscal constraints.7

    The requirement for a force of 34 or 38 amphibious ships relates primarily to meeting wartime needs for amphibious lift. Navy and Marine Corps officials have also testified that fully meeting U.S. regional combatant commander (COCOM) requests for day-to-day forward deployments of amphibious ships would require a force of 50 or more amphibious ships. For example, in testimony to the Seapower and Projection Forces subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee on February 25, 2015, Marine Corps Lieutenant General Kenneth J. Glueck, Jr., Deputy Commandant for Combat Development and Integration and Commanding General of the Marine Corps Combat Development Command, stated that the number needed to fully meet COCOM demands for forward-deployed amphibious ships is “close to 54.”8

    https://fas.org/sgp/crs/weapons/R43543.pdf
     
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