Indian Navy: News & Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Defense Forum' started by Gessler, Jul 20, 2016.

Share This Page

  1. Gessler

    Gessler 1st Lieutenant Staff Member International Mod

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    458
    Location:
    India
    Use this thread to post any general news or discussions about the Indian Navy, it's ships, submarines, aircraft, personnel, and it's future.

    [​IMG]
     
    AMDR, Pathfinder and Parikrama like this.
  2. Technofox

    Technofox That Norwegian girl Staff Member Ret. Military Developer

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2015
    Messages:
    900
    Likes Received:
    3,206
    Occupation:
    Professional "Doer" of "Things"
    Location:
    Norway
    Hobby:
    Being a geek
    @Gessler @Spectre @Parikrama tell me about the IN's special missions ships, i.e. intelligence, telemetry and tracking, testing and self defense, and stuff of that nature.

    An example of what I'm looking for is INS Sagardhwani - a "research ship" with the cover story of oceanographic mapping and buoy recovery, which is an oft used euphemism for intelligence ships. I've also heard it's responsible for weapons testing:

    [​IMG]

    What other goodies do you guys have?
     
  3. Gessler

    Gessler 1st Lieutenant Staff Member International Mod

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    458
    Location:
    India
    There are a total of 9 Research/Survey vessels: a single Sagardhwani-class, 7 Sandhayak-class and the first of 6 Makar-class catamarans...dunno how many of them are being used for Intelligence purposes, or how many CAN be used - I think only Sagardhwani, but I could be wrong.

    [​IMG]
    INS Sagardhwani

    [​IMG]
    INS Sarvekshak, a Sandhayak-class Survey vessel

    [​IMG]
    INS Makar


    But a new, dedicated ship has been sanctioned for Intel, T&T purposes - It's called the Ocean Surveillance Ship (OSS) project, and it appears the contract was awarded to Hindustan Shipyard Ltd. (HSL) on the Eastern coast. It displaces over 10,000-tons and given the render they provided...it has quite some space to mount all kinds of equipment.

    [​IMG]

    Don't know much else - sorry! @Parikrama ??
     
  4. surya kiran

    surya kiran 2nd Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    75
    Occupation:
    Trader
    Location:
    India
    Also used are the Sukanya class for testing ballistic missiles.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Parikrama

    Parikrama 2nd Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2016
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    167
    Occupation:
    snooze w/o booze
    Location:
    India
    Hobby:
    Sipping Tea/Coffee
    Lakshadeep sea that's one of the support ship for multi mission ship besides what mentioned above.

    Navy has also planned to introduce 5 more utility and Special mission Ships in the fleet on Navy.The ships added are 4 Ships of Multi utility vessels type and 1 ship of Missile Range Instrumentation Vessel Type.The multi utility vessels are in the category of Displacement of 3,500 tonnes.

    It's one of the areas IN is lacking proper ships and numbers. Hopefully we would be able to make up these numbers soon.
     
    Pathfinder and Gessler like this.
  6. Gessler

    Gessler 1st Lieutenant Staff Member International Mod

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2016
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    458
    Location:
    India
    The aircraft carrier INS Viraat, on her final send-off journey from Mumbai. It's finally going to retire after a small refit, followed by the "last voyage" trip.

    [​IMG]

    Bye-Bye! Hope they'll preserve you as a museum...:oops:
     
    AMDR, Pathfinder and Parikrama like this.
  7. surya kiran

    surya kiran 2nd Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    75
    Occupation:
    Trader
    Location:
    India
    [​IMG]
    The Vizag-based Naval Science and Technological Laboratory (NSTL) has successfully completed all trials of the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV).

    “The AUV’s basic design is ready with us after undertaking many user evaluation trials and tests. Now we have asked the Indian Navy to give us its Quality Requirements (QR) so that we can develop the vehicle according to the specific requirements of the Navy. Once we get the QR we will start working on the customised design,” NSTL director CD Malleshwar said.

    The AUV is critical for underwater mine sweeping, mine laying and also to gather intelligence and surveillance of enemy vessels. The one developed by NSTL's scientists can perform tasks at a depth of around 300 to 500 m under the sea, relatively noiselessly and without being detected by enemy vessels.

    It weighs around 1.7 tonnes and can carry around 500 kg of pay load. NSTL also has plans to develop the advanced version of these UAVs in a larger size and 10 to 12 tonnes in weight. According to NSTL sources, the current one is 4 m in length and 1.4 m in width and can move at a speed of about 7 km per hour.

    "The AUVs will enhance the underwater surveying capabilities of the Indian Navy. These vehicles can detect enemy ships and submarines," said an Indian Navy official.

    NSTL, which has added facilities, such as sea keeping and a maneuvering basin, also worked on enhancing sea keeping capabilities of ships, like reducing various signatures released by the naval ships to prevent them from being detected by enemies while moving. NSTL scientists have also developed systems that can reduce the noise made by the propellers for stealth operations.

    @Technofox
     
  8. Technofox

    Technofox That Norwegian girl Staff Member Ret. Military Developer

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2015
    Messages:
    900
    Likes Received:
    3,206
    Occupation:
    Professional "Doer" of "Things"
    Location:
    Norway
    Hobby:
    Being a geek
    Wow! That's... uh, well that's not good for a UAV of that size. The Hugin 1000, which is the same size, has a mission depth of 3000 meters. I'm going to give them the benefit of the doubt and say that's not the depth limit.

    It's probably the likely depth at which it will be operating. Kind of heavy though, isn't it?

    And this is where the limited depth actually comes in handy. Some submarines and mines can be laid or travel under 500m, and a AUV traversing around 500m will be able to detect both.

    But, and this is a big caveat, the sensors are typically bottom or side scanning, so anything above, in front of or behind within a certain traverse (elevation) is going to be a hard find because of the layout of AUVs and where their payload bays are.

    Let's take a look at Hugin for example:



    The detection swath isn't overly large either. It's a problem we're trying to fix, but for the most part, size = range and scan swath size.

    Yes they will, they will absolutely increase the overall capabilities of the IN. Don't ley my critiques get in the way of thinking that, though do let them help guide your overall expectations on performance. They're a another tool that needs to work in conjunction with other tools, not a cure-all

    Critical gear will include a Synthetic Aperture Sonar, like this track taken from Hugin shows:

    [​IMG]

    Bottom and side scan sonars, multibeam echosounders for navigation, sub-bottom profilers, still image camera and side illuminators for visibility in deep waters, a turbidity sonar and other cool goodies. Make sure to link the sensors to ensure they can act as a single unit, and not just parts shoved into the mission bay.

    Any idea about basing though? It's too big to be submarine launches and may need to be tethered to a ship to ensure it can return (something AUVs searching for MH370 have had a problem with due to the large mission range), and tethering the AUV improves its endurance as you wont need to worry about having to have the AUV cut short its mission to return home under its own power.

    It's somewhat air-launch capable too with those dimension.

    ...

    Anyway, as someone who works in the industry, I'm both squealing with excitement and toasting our new brother in the sea.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2016
    AMDR, Pathfinder, surya kiran and 2 others like this.
  9. surya kiran

    surya kiran 2nd Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    75
    Occupation:
    Trader
    Location:
    India
    @Technofox

    I think, this is an experimental prototype. The QSR is not yet out. It was mainly a technology demonstrator, built in collaboration with IIT-Kharagpur (one of the premier engineering colleges in India). The good thing of this project is the involvement of academia in developing and designing the control surfaces for the AUV.
     
    Parikrama likes this.
  10. surya kiran

    surya kiran 2nd Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2016
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    75
    Occupation:
    Trader
    Location:
    India
    Indian Navy Initiates Steps to Acquire Predator B Guardian and EMALS
    - Letters of Request sent for both systems to US Government


    By Gulshan Luthra Published: July 2016


    [​IMG]




    New Delhi. The Indian Navy has initiated the first steps towards acquiring the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) as well as the long range surveillance drone Predator B Guardian by sending Letters of Request (LORs) to the Pentagon under government-to-government deals.





    The LORs, requesting price and availability for 22 Guardians and three EMALS catapults, are now under consideration by the US Department of Defense (DOD) for clearance under the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) programme and according to sources in Washington, a positive view is likely to be taken and discussions between the two countries should begin soon. Once the process is through, the US Government (USG) will confirm by sending Letters of Acceptance (LOAs).

    The Predator B Guardian is a naval version for long range surveillance over the waters while the EMALS is being considered by the Indian Navy for its second indigenous aircraft carrier, INS Vishal, due out by 2028. EMALS has been adopted by the US Navy as its next generation aircraft launch system, and again significantly, for its new generation aircraft carriers beginning with CVN 78 Gerald R Ford, due for delivery this year.

    [​IMG]

    Dr Vivek Lall, Chief Executive Global Commercial Strategic Development for the San Diego-based General Atomics which makes these two systems, declined comment but told India Strategic: “As far as General Atomics is concerned, we will be opening an office in the Indian capital to assist both the Governments as required.”

    [​IMG]

    Notably the Guardian is a high performance Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft, and could only be sold to India after it cleared the Missile Technology Control regime (MTCR) regulations. Powered by a high performance Honeywell TPE331-10 turboprop engine, it operates from a high altitude of 50,000 feet (about 15 km) and can fly for 27 hours before returning to its base.

    Guardian
    Characteristics

    • Wing Span: 66 ft (20m)
    • Length: 36 ft (11m)
    • Powerplant: Honeywell TPE331-10
    • Max Gross Takeoff Weight: 10,500 lb (4763 kg)
    • Fuel Capacity: 3,900 lb (1769 kg)
    • Payload Capacity: 850 lb int. (386 kg)
    • 3,000 lb ext. (1361 kg)
    • Payloads: MTS-B EO/IR
    • Raytheon SeaVue multi-mode maritime radar
      Inmarsat (SATCOM)
      Automated Identification System (AIS)
      SIGINT/ESM system
      Dual-ARC-210 radios
      Dual-Wulfsberg radios
      Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS)
    • Power: 11.0 kVA (redundant)
    Performance

    • Max Altitude: 50,000 ft (about 15 km)
    • Max Endurance: 27 hr
    • Max Air Speed: 240 KTAS
    Features

    • Triple-redundant flight control system
    • Redundant flight control surfaces
    • Remotely piloted or fully autonomous
    • MIL-STD-1760 stores management system
    • Seven external stations for carriage of payloads
    • C-Band line-of-sight data link control
    • Ku-Band beyond line-of-sight/SATCOM data link control
    • Over 90% system operational availability
    • C-130 transportable (or self-deploys)

    It is equipped with day-night sophisticated sensors including Raytheon’s SeaVue multi-mode maritime radar to identify and track vessels of different sizes, signals and electronic intelligence systems, satellite communication and even the Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS).

    The EMALS uses the propulsion power of electromagnetic energy, and the advantage of the system is that it can adapt to launch different sizes of aircraft from a carrier deck with the flick of a switch. Using Direct Current electricity, it is also being devised to launch satellites in the coming years.

    The existing generation of aircraft launch steam catapults, developed decades ago, are much slower.

    The Indian Government has acted fast to acquire these assets towards securing the Indian waters against terrorist and hostile intrusions. The LORs in fact were sent by the Navy soon after Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s official visit to Washington in June, just as the US also anchored India's entry into MTCR and declared India to be a Major Defense Partner (MDP).

    There are no confirmed financial figures for either the drones or the EMALs, but according to industry sources, the list price for the 22 Guardians should be around US $ two billion.

    Overall though, General Atomics, the biggest privately-held US defence company, could land with big multi-billion dollar deals in the coming years as the Indian Air Force (IAF) has also expressed interest in acquiring more than 100 Predator C Avenger attack drones. IAF had sent a communication in September last year, and significantly during Mr Modi's visit, this requirement was mentioned at the highest levels.

    The jet-powered Avenger is a high performance next-generation drone, or Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), for time-sensitive strike missions. It fires missiles to neutralize multiple hostile targets with precision with the flick of a command sent through satellites.

    As the procedural paperwork for this drone could also begin only after the MTCR clearance, the Indian Ministry of Defence (MOD) should clear the proposal in due course. (India has just become the 35th Member of MTCR).

    Notably, FMS deals require government-to-government (g-to-g) negotiations but with active support from the industry which manufactures every system in the US. The process ensures reasonable pricing, largely in accordance with what the US armed forces would pay for similar systems. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) of the Department of Defense (DOD) however charges a fee within a band of 2.5 to 5 percent to facilitate the process.

    For instance, in the case of Boeing C 17 heavy lift transport aircraft, this was fixed at 3.8 percent. The fee varies for different deals, but will be the same for every country that buys the same system from the US.

    The EMALS system is accompanied by Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) to assist in secure landing of aircraft.

    http://www.indiastrategic.in/Indian..._to_Acquire_Predator_B_Guardian_And_EMALS.htm
     
    AMDR, Technofox and Parikrama like this.
Loading...