Military Powered Exoskeletons

Discussion in 'Multi-Domain' started by Cossack25A1, Mar 10, 2016.

?

Are powered exoskeletons useful or not

  1. Useful in all field applications

    3 vote(s)
    75.0%
  2. Useful in some field applications such as logistics

    1 vote(s)
    25.0%
  3. Useful only for helping disabled soldiers and veterans

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. A complete waste of money

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%

Share This Page

  1. Cossack25A1

    Cossack25A1 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2015
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    630
    Location:
    Philippines
    Hobby:
    Collecting Waifus.
    DARPA Tests Battery-Powered Exoskeletons on Real Soldiers
    Deep in the woods in Maryland, the U.S. Army is testing exoskeletons that can lighten the load that soldiers carry



    By Evan Ackerman
    Posted 22 Sep 2015 | 19:00 GMT


    Soldiers often have to hike extended distances while carrying heavy packs and equipment. This soft, lightweight exoskeleton takes on some of that weight, reducing the burden on a soldier’s body. It uses a system of powered cables to provide mechanical assistance, adding carefully timed pulling forces to natural movements so that the user’s own muscles expend less energy.

    The exoskelton was developed by researchers from Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering under a contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

    More -> http://spectrum.ieee.org/video/robo...-batterypowered-exoskeletons-on-real-soldiers


    ------

    What are your opinion about the development of wearable powered exoskeletons?
     
    AMDR, Osmanovic and Pathfinder like this.
  2. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2015
    Messages:
    1,436
    Likes Received:
    2,479
    Location:
    United-States
    I voted useful in all field applications because it literally can be, the only draw back would the cost. Light Infantry would greatly benefit from an exoskeleton, the average weight carried by a soldier is ~90 lb. Thats a lot of weight to carry and you can only walk so far with it, an exoskeleton could extend the range of infantry or it could allow infantry to carry more weight. A problem that could arise with this is what do to do when it runs out of batteries and you have no way to recharge? Do you abandon the equipment? Perhaps it is practical for elite forces that need to penetrate deep into enemy lines but it could be expensive to issue these out to too many soldiers just to have them abandon it. Artillery teams could use exoskeletons for reloading artillery,

    I think unmanned ground vehicles will fill the gap for carrying equipment into combat, an exoskeleton may not be necessary. For field logistics it would be very useful, soldiers can move crates around faster and maybe repair vehicles more easily.

    Disabled soldiers and other disabled people could use it aswell.

    Screen Shot 2016-03-10 at 8.58.33 AM.png
     
    AMDR, Osmanovic and Cossack25A1 like this.
  3. Osmanovic

    Osmanovic 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2016
    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    336
    Location:
    United-States
    Artillery crews can use it and combat engineers. Elite forces can use it too. Imagine if you equip special forces with a those backpack wings for skydiving and they are wearing this. They could travel very far and very silently.
     
    Cossack25A1 likes this.
  4. Technofox

    Technofox That Norwegian girl Staff Member Ret. Military Developer

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2015
    Messages:
    900
    Likes Received:
    3,203
    Occupation:
    Professional "Doer" of "Things"
    Location:
    Norway
    Hobby:
    Being a geek
    I've always been partial to the TALOS system:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    And its newer version:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Even a localized system like this helps soldiers conserve energy:

     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2016
    Cossack25A1, Pathfinder and AMDR like this.
  5. Cossack25A1

    Cossack25A1 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2015
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    630
    Location:
    Philippines
    Hobby:
    Collecting Waifus.
    I wonder, if the powered exoskeleton technology is used in all aspects, will it have the same impact as tanks when it first appeared a century ago in the battlefields of Europe as powered exoskeleton could potentially give an individual the firepower of a Bradley IFV (or similar vehicles of this class), or is it just an over-hyped technology inspired by fiction that has limited uses outside logistics.
     
    Pathfinder likes this.
  6. Cossack25A1

    Cossack25A1 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2015
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    630
    Location:
    Philippines
    Hobby:
    Collecting Waifus.
    Pathfinder likes this.
  7. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2015
    Messages:
    1,436
    Likes Received:
    2,479
    Location:
    United-States
    I think it is a little over hyped but in space they will be used a lot I think, especially for crews working on space craft.

    For day to day military operations it is rather limited to moving items from point a to point b, even that is in question as we already have forklifts. Why would you take an exoskeleton on a military operation? Once it runs out of power you are stuck with a bigger mess.
     
    Cossack25A1 likes this.
Loading...