The tank, a century after its debut

Discussion in 'Military History' started by Cossack25A1, Sep 15, 2016.

Share This Page

  1. Cossack25A1

    Cossack25A1 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2015
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    630
    Location:
    Philippines
    Hobby:
    Collecting Waifus.
    Tank at 100: Baptism of fire, fear and blood
    By Greig Watson BBC News

    • 15 September 2016
    • From the section England

    The tank, which would go on to dominate 20th Century warfare, first stormed on to the shattered battlefields of the Somme 100 years ago. Rushed into battle by desperate generals with barely any testing, its debut was a messy experiment with questionable results. A select group of young men were the first to feel its terrible influence and have their lives changed by it.

    William Dawson came from Boston in Lincolnshire and was the eldest of four children. His father had drowned at sea in 1898 when he was 10 years old and as soon as he left school, Dawson went to work to support the family.

    He found employment with a shipping company but had an interest in engines. In early 1916 he answered an advert in Motor Cycle magazine, in which the Motor Machine Gun Service (MMGS) asked for mechanically-minded recruits for intriguingly vague Army service.

    A few days later Dawson was locked into a training ground in Suffolk being given "a very serious talk explaining that the new project was so very very secret that he could give no details but that it was most important".

    "The secret camp was very large, roughly circular and some three or four miles across. The perimeter was guarded day and night by 500 or more reservists fully armed with rifles and ammunition," he wrote years later.

    "Early one morning just after daylight we were awakened by a rumbling and rattling with sounds of motor engines.

    "In great excitement everybody rushed out of tents, just as they had slept, and there they were, the first of the tanks, passing our tents to the practice driving ground which we had prepared."

    Describing the appearance as "extraordinary", he added: "We immediately started to learn its mechanism and engine and commenced driving it round the course of three to four feet high obstructions."

    The idea of armoured fighting vehicles had been around since Leonardo da Vinci but at the outbreak of World War One, practical battlefield machines were for most soldiers scarcely more than science fiction.

    But as the fighting in France and Belgium bogged down into trench warfare, the concept gained supporters.

    Having seen conditions on the Western Front as an official Army correspondent, Col Ernest Swinton was in a position to push for bulletproof tractors to crush wire and cross trenches.

    -----
    More -> http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-37302722
    -----
     
    Falcon and Freyja like this.
  2. Freyja

    Freyja 2nd Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2016
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    279
    Occupation:
    1/2 Gaming 1/2 Baking
    Location:
    Norway
    Hobby:
    Video Games
    To from the MK1 to the T-14 in just 100 years is incredible!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    How many times have we heard that the tank is obsolete due to PGMs, ATGMs, Helicopters, Tank destroyers, urban warfare or what have you? Too many times and yet they're still as relevant as ever.

    Can't wait to see what the next 100 years holds!

    ...

    I'm disappointed none of Da Vinci's designs never panned out:(. Curious though, his tank designs were designed with a built-in handicap. Their wheels were arranged so the shaft would only move the tank only in a circle.

    Perhaps that was intended or an oversight or a purposeful defect, not that a skilled engineer couldn't solve it.

    [​IMG]

    Would have been amazing to see Da Vinci's machines on a Renaissance battlefield.
     
    Falcon and Cossack25A1 like this.
  3. Falcon

    Falcon Major Staff Member Social Media Team

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2015
    Messages:
    984
    Likes Received:
    1,491
    Location:
    United-States
    Tanks were becoming very vulnerable until APS's came out. Israeli tanks went through hezbollahs ATGM meat grinder in the mid 2000's but Israeli tanks and APC's were saved by APS in the recent Gaza operation. Assad has lost hundreds of tanks and apc's to ATGM's and the Saudi's have lost many vehicles to them in Yemen. In my opinion tanks without APS are pretty much outdated. Your'e sendeing a multi million dollar contraption out to be blown up by slipper people.
     
    Cossack25A1 likes this.
  4. Cossack25A1

    Cossack25A1 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2015
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    630
    Location:
    Philippines
    Hobby:
    Collecting Waifus.
    I really doubt that there will be vehicles that will be able to replace tanks. Also people who think mecha will replace tank IRL have no idea that a tank is more cost-effective and a better weapon than something that moves on two or four mechanical legs, not to mention that you can hide a tank inside a building whereas a mecha is like a giant, towering bulls-eye when places in cities like Fallujah.
     
Loading...