US Aerospace Programs

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by Sven, Oct 9, 2015.

Share This Page

  1. Sven

    Sven Teh Viking dood Industry Professional Ret. Military

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    418
    Occupation:
    Military Research
    Location:
    United-States
    Hobby:
    Computer stuff
    These Astronauts Designed Experiments for Space by Swimming Underwater

    [​IMG]

    December 18, 1975: This is no casual swim: astronauts Carolyn Griner, Ann Whitaker, and Mary-Helen Johnston train in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator to help design new experiments to conduct in the challenging environment of space.

    [​IMG]
    1976: Griner, Johnston, and Whitaker [clockwise from front] in scuba gear before descenting into the tank. Image credit: NASA

    Unlike many early space agency programs composed of all-women teams, the program had nothing to do with testing the suitability or limitations of women in spaceflight. Instead, it relied entirely on their knowledge and expertise to solve problems, not their biological characteristics as test subjects.

    The three women trained at Marshall Space Flight Center’s Neutral Buoyancy Simulator as part of their efforts to design and develop new experiments for astronauts to conduct in microgravity. Each specialized in a different field: Dr. Griner in material science, Dr. Whitaker in lubrication and surface physics, and Dr. Johnson in metallurgical engineering. Their job was to identify what tasks could be completed in microgravity, and which ones required additional foot- or hand-holds or specialized tools. The experiments they designed were flown on Spacelab, a European-built science module for the Space Shuttles.

    [​IMG]
    1976: Whitaker, Johnston, and Griner [clockwise from front] in scuba gear emerging from the tank. Image credit: NASA

    This was far from the first time the three women trained together: the trio were joined by Doris Chandler in 1974 for a series of NASA experiments. Their participation in a five-day simulated Spacelab experiment in 1974 proved the benefit of having a highly-trained crew for everything from identifying minor malfunctions to salvaging experiments. A 1976 report concluded:

    “Had it not been for the extremely knowledgeable science crew, two experiments at least would have been lost early in the simulation. [They] were saved both by their knowledge of the hardware and the science that was to be obtained.”

    Although none of the trio ever went to space, they continued to contribute to human space exploration. Ginder helped design the Saturn V, and later became the Deputy Director and later the first woman to serve as Acting Center Director at Marshall Space Flight Center. Whitaker became a pioneer in predicting the behaviour of materials in space, first serving as the chief of the Physical Sciences Branch, the Engineering Physics Division, and the Project and Environmental Engineering Devision before moving on to be the Director of the Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnston designed and flew Spacelab experiments, directed mission activities from ground control center, and served as an alternate payload specialist.
     
    Falcon, Admin and AMDR like this.
  2. Sven

    Sven Teh Viking dood Industry Professional Ret. Military

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    418
    Occupation:
    Military Research
    Location:
    United-States
    Hobby:
    Computer stuff
    Walking on the Walls is Weirdly Equivalent to Walking on the Moon

    [​IMG]

    Who needs 1980s music videos when you can have actual scenes from NASA astronaut training programs?

    In 1964, NASA’s Langley Research Center was focused on helping astronauts train for the unknown challenges awaiting them during the Apollo moon landings. In order to test out how astronauts would navigate challenges under one-sixth reduced lunar gravity, researchers strung their test subjects up with a series of slings. With 5/6th of his weight supported by the sling, the test subject still had the freedom of movement to hop, jump, walk, and stroll under simulated lunar gravity. At least, as much freedom as was permitted by the stiff, encumbering space suit.

    [​IMG]
    August 1, 1968: The first step of practicing a moon walk on the Earth is to defy gravity and walk sideways for a researcher at the Lunar Landing Research Facility gantry. Image credit: NASA
     
    Falcon, Admin and AMDR like this.
  3. Sven

    Sven Teh Viking dood Industry Professional Ret. Military

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    418
    Occupation:
    Military Research
    Location:
    United-States
    Hobby:
    Computer stuff
    Testing Hardware for Growing Plants and Vegetables in Space

    Astronauts on the International Space Station continue testing the VEGGIE hardware for growing vegetables and plants in space. VEGGIE provides lighting and nutrient supply for plants in the form of a low-cost growth chamber and planting "pillows" -- helping provide nutrients for the root system.

    [​IMG]
     
    Admin likes this.
  4. Sven

    Sven Teh Viking dood Industry Professional Ret. Military

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    418
    Occupation:
    Military Research
    Location:
    United-States
    Hobby:
    Computer stuff
    Amazing video turns Apollo Archive photos to life with truly stunning 3D effects

    [​IMG]

    This is just awesome. Stop reading and start watching the video below. Tom Kucy used 3D effects and motion to bring the recently released photos from NASA’s Apollo Archive to life. The photos that document the most amazing feats of human history now feel like they’re moving videos. It is so completely awe-inspiring.

    Kucy writes:

    GROUND CONTROL is a small personal project, bringing NASA’s Apollo Archive photos to life. With the intention of bring more missions life, stay tuned for more.


     
    Falcon and Admin like this.
  5. Sven

    Sven Teh Viking dood Industry Professional Ret. Military

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    418
    Occupation:
    Military Research
    Location:
    United-States
    Hobby:
    Computer stuff
    Last GPS Block-IIF Satellite Arrives at Cape Canaveral as GPS IIF-11 Awaits Oct 30 Atlas-V Launch

    http://www.americaspace.com/?p=87364

    [​IMG]
    A quality assurance team from the 45th Launch Group off-loads an Air Force GPS IIF-12 satellite from a C-17 Globemaster III on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., Oct. 8, 2015. A crowd from the government and industry partnership, who will complete the satellite’s final assembly, gathered on the Cape’s “Skid Strip” to watch the off-loading of the satellite they will prepare to launch aboard a United Launch Alliance rocket in 2016. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force/James Rainier

    The final U.S. Air Force Global Positioning System (GPS) Block 2F satellite in a fleet of 12 has been delivered to its Cape Canaveral Air Force Station launch site in Florida for final processing and preparation for flight. The Boeing-made GPS IIF-12 satellite was flown from Boeing’s Satellite Development Center in El Segundo, California, on Oct. 8 aboard a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft, and will now undergo a series of prelaunch preparations, checks and rehearsals, including functional checkout of the spacecraft, compatibility testing, battery installation, fueling, mating to the payload adapter and obtaining a final flight weight before being put atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas-V 401 booster for launch NET (No Earlier Than) Feb. 2016.

    “This GPS IIF-12 satellite represents the end of a legacy as it will be the last of the 61 GPS satellites processed here at (Cape Canaveral Air Force Station),” said Brig. Gen. Wayne Monteith, 45th Space Wing commander. “This culminates an incredible 27-year legacy at our Area 59 Satellite Processing Facility. We are the nation’s premier gateway to space and are humbled to be a part of the team that provides GPS and its capabilities to the world.”

    The Air Force Airmen-led processing team at Area 59 has been behind every GPS launch since the first GPS IIF launched from Florida in May 2010. The $245 million GPS IIF-11 satellite is scheduled to launch in less than 3 weeks, and should be mated to its Atlas-V rocket sometime this week at Space Launch Complex-41 (SLC-41), while GPS IIF-12 processes for launch early next year.

    [​IMG]
    File photo of a GPS Block 2F satellite. Photo Credit: Boeing

    “Our combined team’s objective is 100 percent mission success each and every time,” said Col. Eric Krystkowiak, the 45th Launch Group commander. “My Airmen work, in partnership, with Boeing and the system program office at the Space and Missile Systems Center throughout the final stages of satellite processing prior to launch. From spacecraft containerization, shipment from California, the arrival at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Landing Strip, final checkouts, fueling and encapsulation, the team is laser focused on identifying and mitigating any issues that could potentially jeopardize mission success.”

    “Mission assurance at the launch base is executed with our ‘triad’ of professionals,” Krystkowiak added. “Our mission assurance technicians are enlisted personnel with many years of experience in missile maintenance who are fully engaged and observe the contractor’s work with the satellite. They bring their hands-on experience, strict technical compliance and discipline to the satellite processing realm. Beside them are our company grade officers and civilian engineers who bring their engineering rigor and innovative ideas into the process. Lastly are our Aerospace Corporation partners who provide invaluable experience and legacy system insight to the team with their continuity of satellite processing. Many of these members have been here at the Cape since GPS first launched in 1989 and achieved full operational capability in 1995.”

    The 3,600 pound Block 2F GPS satellites serve as an interim network to keep the Navstar system fully operational until the next-generation (and long-delayed) GPS Block III-A constellation comes online, which won’t be until at least 2017. There are eight GPS III satellites being developed by Lockheed Martin under a $1.4 billion contract with the Air Force, and each will have a 15-year design life (more than 25 percent longer than the newest Block IIF satellites), provide three times the accuracy, eight times the anti-jam capability and possess a much stronger signal power than the previous satellites. The GPS III-A network may eventually comprise as many as 32 satellites, but for now the Air Force has only formally contracted for four.

    GPS boosts productivity in almost every aspect of society and across a wide swath of the economy, to include farming, construction mining, surveying, supply chain management and more. Major communications networks, banking systems, financial markets, and power grids depend on GPS and the technology is embedded in virtually every component of U.S. military operations, protecting U.S. warfighters by providing navigational assistance and timing standards for military operations on land, at sea and in the air. Civilian users around the world also use and depend on GPS for highly accurate time, location, and velocity information.
     
    Falcon, AMDR and Admin like this.
  6. Sven

    Sven Teh Viking dood Industry Professional Ret. Military

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    418
    Occupation:
    Military Research
    Location:
    United-States
    Hobby:
    Computer stuff
    Curiosity Self-Portrait at 'Big Sky' Drilling Site

    This self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle at the "Big Sky" site, where its drill collected the mission's fifth taste of Mount Sharp.

    The scene combines dozens of images taken during the 1,126th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars (Oct. 6, 2015, PDT), by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera at the end of the rover's robotic arm. The rock drilled at this site is sandstone in the Stimson geological unit inside Gale Crater. The location is on cross-bedded sandstone in which the cross bedding is more evident in views from when the rover was approaching the area, such as http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19818 .


    [​IMG]
     
    Admin likes this.
  7. Sven

    Sven Teh Viking dood Industry Professional Ret. Military

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    418
    Occupation:
    Military Research
    Location:
    United-States
    Hobby:
    Computer stuff
    Record Breaker: Scott Kelly Becomes Most Experienced U.S. Astronaut Tomorrow

    Tomorrow (10/15/15), Scott Kelly will surpass fellow NASA astronaut Mike Fincke to become the United States’ most flight-experienced spacefarer. Photo Credit: NASA

    [​IMG]
     
    Admin likes this.
  8. Sven

    Sven Teh Viking dood Industry Professional Ret. Military

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    418
    Occupation:
    Military Research
    Location:
    United-States
    Hobby:
    Computer stuff
    August 30, 1983: It’s never a good sign when nature gets too involved in a rocket launch. This lightning storm put on a spectacular display during rainy skies the morning before Challenger blasted off in the first pre-dawn launch of the space shuttle program.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    They launched anyway

    [​IMG]
     
    AMDR and Admin like this.
  9. Technofox

    Technofox That Norwegian girl Staff Member Ret. Military Developer

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2015
    Messages:
    900
    Likes Received:
    3,204
    Occupation:
    Professional "Doer" of "Things"
    Location:
    Norway
    Hobby:
    Being a geek
    Virgin Galactic Announces New "Cosmic Girl” Mothership That Could Help It Compete With SpaceX

    [​IMG]

    Space cowboy Richard Branson and his company, Virgin Galactic, showed off a 747-400 airplane that could launch rocket payloads from the air straight into orbit.

    The mothership, a.k.a “Cosmic Girl,” would carry Virgin Galactic’s LauncherOne rockets to new heights. In concept, using a modified commercial airplane as a rocket-carrier negates the need for a ground launch pad and all of its attendant logistics. Instead, the rocket is bound to the plane’s wing, and after reaching an altitude of 35,000 feet on its hitched ride, it can disengage, fire up its engine, and continue its mission to deposit a satellite payload into orbit.

    Cosmic Girl, which has been in the Virgin fleet as a commercial aircraft since 2001, is set to undergo quite the transformation, per Virgin’s press release: “the LauncherOne rocket will be mounted to the carrier aircraft under the left wing, adjacent to the position that has been used by other 747s to ferry a fifth engine.” The rocket weighs about 55,000 pounds.

    [​IMG]

    ...

    Read the rest: http://gizmodo.com/virgin-galactic-announces-new-cosmic-girl-mothership-1746068379
     
    Falcon, AMDR and Admin like this.
  10. Technofox

    Technofox That Norwegian girl Staff Member Ret. Military Developer

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2015
    Messages:
    900
    Likes Received:
    3,204
    Occupation:
    Professional "Doer" of "Things"
    Location:
    Norway
    Hobby:
    Being a geek
    SUCCESS! Cygnus Launches in First Mission Since Antares Rocket Explosion

    [​IMG]

    The Cygnus has its wings again! After four attempts, the cargo tug is finally on its way to the International Space Station. The commercial spacecraft will deliver equipment and supplies to astronauts when it arrives at the station on December 9th.

    [​IMG]

    Cygnus launching at sunset over Cuba, as seen from the International Space Station. Image credit:NASA/Scott Kelly


    After the first launch attempt on December 3rd was scrubbed due to foul weather, a second scrubbed by gusting winds, and a third postponed for winds again, the Cygnus spacecraft launched at 4:44pm ET on December 6th. This is a return-to-flight mission: the first flight of the Cygnus since the previous spacecraft was destroyed during an Antares rocket explosion in October 2014. This is a journey of other firsts, too: the first of the new Enhanced Cygnus configuration, its first launch an an Atlas V rocket, and its first launch out of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

    The launch was absolutely picture-perfect. The countdown had no issues or holds. The Atlas V blasted off within a tenth of a second of the very start of the 30-minute window, firing both main and second stage boosters exactly as scheduled to deliver the Cgynus spacecraft to orbit in 21 minutes. Now the spacecraft will deploy its solar panels and use its newly-improved power system to sneak up on the International Space Station, arriving the morning of December 9, 2015. Astronauts will direct the Canadarm2 to grapple the spacecraft, pulling it in to dock later that day.

    ...

    Read the rest here. It's a big article, so there's a lot a more content to view.
     
    Falcon and AMDR like this.
Loading...
Tags: