What Middle Eastern Countries Buy May Not be What They Need

Discussion in 'The Middle East & North Africa' started by Pathfinder, Apr 22, 2016.

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  1. Pathfinder

    Pathfinder Lieutenant Colonel

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    (I don't agree with some of the wording in this article, the US does not give Gulf Countries weapons rather they buy them)

    Too often, U.S. security assistance to its Middle Eastern partners is imbalanced toward big-ticket military hardware such as multi-billion-dollar advanced fighter jet deals. These sales do not need to stop. They are valuable for American industry and they deepen U.S. relations with regional partners. They are oftentimes what a regional partner wants for their own security and for global and regional prestige. But this type of assistance does not address the complex challenge caused by increasingly more effective and dangerous asymmetric threats such as ISIS, al-Qaeda and its affiliates, or Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) and its proxies.

    Look at U.S. military aid to the Gulf states: between 2008 and 2011, there was an eight-fold increase in the number of export agreements concerning prestigious conventional weapons. And at last May’s Camp David Summit, the U.S.responded to its Gulf partners’ fear about the spread of Iranian influence and the looming nuclear deal by promising to allow an estimated $15 billion in new arms sales.

    By contrast, the IRGC is accomplishing its region-wide agenda through sectarian surrogates for far less money—roughly $2 billion per year—and with greater strategic return to its core interests. Iran has employed a longer-term approach built on transforming local politics and shaping state institutions to its favor in Lebanon, Iraq, Syria, and, to a lesser extent, Yemen. This is an unconventional warfare strategy that U.S. partners have not been able to address by conventional means. Thus, despite the GCC’s conventional and irregular warfare advantage over Iran, they are unable to collectively exercise their superior military edge.

    Rest is here:
    http://www.defenseone.com/ideas/201...t-always-what-they-need/127613/?oref=d-skybox

    @Scorpion Thoughts?
     
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